Saggar Series

These sculptures were created using a 3D clay printer and fired in a saggar, the process of which is explained further down. The marks left by the organic material can be controlled it a certain extent but they are many variants within the firing that can change the outcomes such as the type of kiln, the position in the kiln and the length of the firing.
The intended effect was to produce objects that look like they could have been buried hundred of years ago. The work was created to question whether digital processes are that far removed from the traditions of ceramics, or just another natural progression of potter's tools.

Saggar 3d print
Saggar 3d print
Saggar 3d print
Saggar 3d print
Saggar 3d print
 

Saggar firing is a traditional firing technique that creates a confined atmosphere around the ceramicware, typically inside of a larger ceramic vessel or box. Here a box made of kiln shelves were used to create the box but a range of materials such as aluminium foil can be used.
Originally these types of firings were done to protect the vessels from ash or debris in the firing chamber but potters realised the process could be used in opposite way to colour the fired ware.
Inside the Saggar box I use a variety of organic materials to give colour to the ceramics, the rest of the box is then packed with combustibles such sawdust.